Research and Scientific Studies on Reversing Type 2 Diabetes with Keto or Restricted Diets

Below you'll find summaries and links to research and scientific studies about the benefits of a Ketogenic diet and its role in reversing Type 2 Diabetes.

Research Studies

Name of Study:
Primary care-led weight management for remission of type 2 diabetes (DiRECT): an open-label, cluster-randomised trial

Summary:
Almost half of participants (and 90% of trial patients who lost 33 pounds or more) achieved remission to a non-diabetic state and came off antidiabetic drugs within 12 months. "Remission of type 2 diabetes is a practical target for primary care."

Links to study or articles about the study:
The Lancet - VOLUME 391, ISSUE 10120, P541-551, FEBRUARY 10, 2018 

 

Name of Study:
The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

Summary:
The diet containing fewer carbohydrates, the low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet, was more effective for improving glycemic control than the low glycemic diet. Lifestyle modification using low-carbohydrate diet interventions are effective for reversing obesity and type 2 diabetes, and may play an important role in reversing the current epidemic of 'diabesity.'

Links to study or articles about the study:
BioMed Central Nutrition & Metabolism 5:36

 

Name of Study:
Induced and controlled dietary ketosis as a regulator of obesity and metabolic syndrome pathologies

Summary:
A group of 30 adults, previously diagnosed by their primary care physician, were randomly prescribed to one of three groups: a sustained ketogenic diet with no exercise, standard American diet (SAD) with no exercise or SAD with 3-5 days per week of exercise (30 min.). The results demonstrated that the change over time from week 0 to week 10 was significant in the ketogenic group for weight, body fat percentage, BMI, HgA1c and ketones.

Links to study or articles about the study:
Science Direct Volume 11, Supplement 1, November 2017

 

Name of Study:
Remission of Human Type 2 Diabetes Requires Decrease in Liver and Pancreas Fat Content but Is Dependent upon Capacity for β Cell Recovery

Summary:
Remission of Human Type 2 Diabetes Requires Decrease in Liver and Pancreas Fat Content but Is Dependent upon Capacity for β Cell Recovery.

Links to study or articles about the study:
Cell Metabolism August 02, 2018

 

Name of Study:
Low-carbohydrate diet in type 2 diabetes: stable improvement of bodyweight and glycemic control during 44 months follow-up

Summary:
A reduced carbohydrate diet is effective in motivated patients and can be recommended for overweight patients with type 2 diabetes.

Links to study or articles about the study:
BioMed Central Nutrition & Metabolism 5:14

 

Name of Study:
A Low-Carbohydrate as Compared with a Low-Fat Diet in Severe Obesity

Summary:
Severely obese subjects with a high prevalence of diabetes or the metabolic syndrome lost more weight during six months on a carbohydrate-restricted diet than on a calorie- and fat-restricted diet, with a relative improvement in insulin sensitivity and triglyceride levels, even after adjustment for the amount of weight lost.

Links to study or articles about the study:
New England Journal of Medicine 348:2074-2081

 

Name of Study:
Beyond weight loss: a review of the therapeutic uses of very-low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diets

Summary:
There are new and exciting scenarios about the use of ketogenic diets, as discussed in this review, in cancer, Type 2 Diabetes, PCOS, cardiovascular and neurological diseases.

Links to study or articles about the study:
Nature - June 2013